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Rules For Broadcasting

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Local Rule 18. CONDITIONS FOR BROADCASTING AND PHOTOGRAPHING COURT OF CLAIMS PROCEEDINGS

  1. Permission for Broadcasting, Recording by Electronic Means or Photographing. Except as supplemented by this rule, the provisions of Rule 11 of the Rules of Superintendence for Courts of Common Pleas shall be applicable to requests for permission to broadcast, record by electronic means or photograph proceedings in the court of claims.
  2. Administration
    • Requests for Permission, When and Where Filed. Requests for permission to broadcast, televise, record or photograph in the courtroom shall be in writing to the clerk as far in advance as reasonably practical, but in no event later than one work day prior to the courtroom session to be broadcast or photographed unless otherwise permitted by the trial judge. Request forms may be obtained from the clerk’s office.
    • Duty of Clerk Upon Receipt; Duty of Court. The clerk shall immediately inform the trial judge of the request. The trial judge shall grant the request in writing consistent with Canon 3(A)(7) of the Code of Judicial Conduct, Superintendence Rule 11, and this local rule. Written permission shall be made a part of the record of the proceeding.
  3. Pooling. Arrangements shall be made between or among media for pooling equipment and personnel authorized by this rule to cover the court sessions. Such arrangements are to be made outside the courtroom and without imposing on the trial judge or court personnel to mediate any dispute as to the appropriate media “pool” representative or equipment authorized to cover a particular session. In the event disputes arise between or among media representatives, the trial judge may exclude all contesting representatives from the proceeding.
  4. Equipment and Personnel
    • Television, Videotape or Movie Equipment and Personnel. Not more than one portable camera (television, videotape or movie), operated by not more than one in-court camera person, shall be permitted without authorization of the trial judge.
    • Photographic Equipment and Personnel. Not more than one still photographer, utilizing not more than two still cameras of professional quality with not more than two lenses for each camera, shall be permitted without authorization of the trial judge.
    • Radio Equipment. Not more than one audio system for radio broadcast purposes shall be permitted without authorization of the trial judge.
    • Audio Tape Equipment. If audio arrangements cannot be reasonably made in advance, the trial judge may permit one audio portable tape recorder at the bench which will be activated prior to commencement of the courtroom session. Audio portable tape recorders may not be used without prior permission of the trial judge.
  5. Light and Sound Criteria.
    • Distracting Equipment. Only professional quality telephonic, photographic and audio equipment which does not produce distracting sound or light shall be employed to cover courtroom sessions. No motor driven still cameras shall be permitted.
    • Artificial Light. No artificial lighting device other than that normally used in the courtroom shall be employed. However, if the normal lighting in the courtroom can be improved without becoming obtrusive, the trial judge may permit modification.
    • Audio Pickup. Audio pickup by microphone for all media purposes shall be accomplished from existing audio systems present in the courtroom. If no technically suitable audio system exists in the courtroom, microphones and related wiring essential for all media purposes shall be unobtrusive and located in places designated by the trial judge in advance of any session.
  6. Location of Equipment and Personnel.
    • Location of Equipment. Court of Claims trials to be heard in Franklin County where media coverage is requested pursuant to this rule shall, to the extent possible, be held in Court Room 1 of the Court of Claims. In the event that the subject trial is a jury trial, one television camera shall be positioned on a tripod in the northwest corner of the court room, but shall not interfere with the jury’s access to the jury room. If the subject trial is not a jury trial, one television camera shall be positioned on a tripod in the southeast corner of the jury box. Videotape recording equipment or other technical equipment which is not a component part of an in-court television or broadcasting unit shall be located in a room adjacent to or outside of the courtroom.
    • Conduct of Operators. The television, broadcast and still camera operators shall position themselves in a location in the courtroom as directed by the trial judge, either standing or sitting, and shall assume a fixed position within that area. Having established themselves in a shooting position, they shall act so as not to call attention to themselves through further movement. Sudden moves, pans, tilts or zooms by any camera operators are prohibited. Operators shall not be permitted to move about in order to obtain photographs or broadcasts of courtroom sessions, but only to leave or enter the courtroom.
    • Time for Placing or Removing Equipment. Television cameras, microphones and taping equipment shall not be placed in, moved about or removed from the courtroom except prior to commencement or after adjournment of the session (the trial judge has not gaveled the proceeding to order or adjournment), or during a recess. Neither television film magazines, rolls or lenses, still camera film, nor audio portable tape cassettes shall be changed within a courtroom except during a recess.
  7. Miscellaneous. Proper courtroom decorum shall be maintained by all media pool participants. All media representatives shall be properly attired, in a manner that reflects positively upon the journalistic profession.
  8. Limitations.
    • Audio Pickup of Conferences. There shall be no audio pickup or broadcast of conferences conducted in a courtroom between counsel and clients, co-counsel, or the trial judge and counsel.
    • Jurors; Witnesses. The photographing, filming, videotaping, televising or recording of any juror shall not be permitted. The trial judge shall inform victims and witnesses of their right to object to being photographed, filmed, videotaped, televised or recorded and shall prohibit the photographing, filming, videotaping, televising or recording of any victim or witness who does object.
    • Revocation of Permission. Upon the failure of any media representative to comply with the conditions prescribed by the trial judge, the Rules of Superintendence of the Supreme Court, or this Rule, the trial judge may revoke the permission to broadcast, photograph or record the trial or hearing.

OHIO JUDICIAL CENTER REGULATION 13. News Conferences.

  1. Promotion of public understanding. The Supreme Court promotes the general understanding of the judicial process by providing maximum public access and exposure to the proceedings of the Court. This access and exposure can be enhanced by news conferences. However, news conferences should not interfere with the dignity and decorum befitting the judicial branch of Ohio government, nor create an impression that judicial determinations may be influenced by direct advocacy at such conferences. The purpose of this regulation is to balance the promotion of public awareness and discussion with the need for the courts, tribunals, and organizations that maintain offices in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center to conduct their work without the appearance of direct advocacy outside the courtroom setting.
  2. News conferences within the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center. A news conference may be conducted within the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center as set forth herein.
    • By persons employed in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center. A news conference may be conducted within the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center by any person who is employed by any court, tribunal, or organization that maintains an office in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center pursuant to policies and guidelines established by that court, tribunal, or organization. However, the news conference may be conducted in an area of the building outside the business offices of the court, tribunal, or organization where the person is employed only upon providing notice to the Supreme Court Director of Public information, who shall coordinate the event with the Supreme Court Office of Facilities Management.
    • Regarding litigation. A news conference regarding pending litigation before a court or tribunal housed in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center may be conducted within the building by persons involved with the litigation only on the days that the court or tribunal is in session hearing the matter. The news conference may only be conducted in an area of the building designated by the court or tribunal upon consultation with the Supreme Court Director of Public Information, who shall coordinate the event with the Supreme Court Office of Facilities Management.A news conference regarding contemplated or completed litigation before a court or tribunal housed in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center is not permitted within the building. This includes impromptu news conferences and media events, such as videographing or photographing the filing of a complaint or other pleading with the clerk of the court or tribunal.
    • Regarding other issues. A news conference by any person not employed by a court, tribunal, or organization that maintains an office in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center may be conducted in the building on issues other than pending litigation as follows:
      • On issues involving the history of the Supreme Court or the judicial branch of Ohio government;
      • On issues involving the awareness and understanding of the role of the bar and the judiciary, and the significance of the principle of the rule of law, in a constitutional democracy; principle of the rule of law, in a constitutional democracy;
      • On issues involving the study of law and the scholarly comparison of legal systems;
      • On issues involving the promotion and understanding of art and architecture and the preservation of historic public places, or the artistic, architectural, and historic features of the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center.

      A news conference on any of these issues may be conducted only upon the approval of the Supreme Court Director of Public Information, who shall coordinate the event with the Supreme Court Office of Facilities Management.

    • News Conferences on the grounds of the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center. A news conference may be conducted on the grounds of the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center as set forth herein.
      • By persons employed in the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center. News conferences may be conducted on the grounds of the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center by any person who is employed by any court, tribunal, or organization that maintains an office in the building pursuant to policies and guidelines established by that court, tribunal, or organization, except that the conference may only be conducted at locations authorized by OJC Reg. 12 (Public Demonstrations) for public demonstrations, and upon providing reasonable notice to the Supreme Court Director of Facilities Management and the Supreme Court Director of Public Information that the news conference is scheduled to take place.
      • By other persons. A news conference regarding any issue may be conducted on the grounds of the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center by any person who does not work in the building or by a group or organization that does not maintain an office in the building, except that the conference may only be conducted at locations authorized by OJC Reg. 12 (Public Demonstrations) for public demonstrations.

Effective Date: July 1, 2005

Amended Effective: March 1, 2013

Additional Information

Who can be sued in the Ohio Court of Claims?
The state of Ohio is the only defendant in the Court of Claims. The state includes the General Assembly, Supreme Court, offices of all elected state officers (governor, attorney general, auditor of state, secretary of state, and the treasurer of state), all state departments, boards, offices, commissions, agencies, institutions, and state colleges and universities. (Click here for a list of state agencies or click here for a list of colleges & universities.) Claims can also be filed in this Court against individual state employees for their wrongful conduct.
Who cannot be sued in the Ohio Court of Claims?
The Ohio Court of Claims has no jurisdiction over lawsuits involving private parties or businesses, or lawsuits involving federal, county, city, township or village governments, agencies or employees.
What is state employee immunity?
Immunity refers to a protection from personal liability that may be provided to a state employee who is sued in his or her individual capacity. Immunity may be provided so long as the actions of the employee giving rise to the lawsuit were within the course and scope of the employee’s duties and the employee did not act with malice, in bad faith, or in a wanton or reckless manner. If these conditions are met and the employee is named as a defendant in a lawsuit, the state will provide legal representation and take financial responsibility for the conduct of the employee.
What is the difference between an administrative determination claim and a judicial claim?
If the amount of money you are seeking is $10,000 or less, your case will be assigned to the small claims category of cases known as administrative determinations. This category was created to provide a quick, informal and inexpensive way of determining your claim, so that the average person can file a claim without the assistance of an attorney. Administrative determination claims are decided by the Clerk of the Court and based on the documents, photos, affidavits, etc. that you submit. There is no trial or hearing. If the amount of money you are seeking is in excess of $10,000, your claim will be assigned to the judicial case category. Judicial cases are heard and decided by a judge or magistrate. There are no jury trials in the Court of Claims.
How do I file a claim in the Court of Claims?
Odyssey eFileOH™ is now available in the Ohio Court of Claims. Claims for $10,000 or less: It’s okay to represent yourself, but you must complete the Claim Form and submit the $25 filing fee before the Court will begin to process your claim. Click here for detailed completion instructions. Claims greater than $10,000: Although you may still use the claim form in this case, we suggest hiring an attorney to represent you throughout the judicial process. Various bar associations and legal clinics throughout the state can provide the names of attorneys, including some who will accept pro bono clients.
How do I fill out the claim form?
At a minimum, you will need to tell us when and where the claim occurred, the amount of the claim and why you think the state of Ohio is responsible for your losses. Click here for detailed instructions. You may file in person, electronically by eFile, or mail your claim and accompanying documents to:
Ohio Court of Claims The Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center 65 South Front Street, Third Floor Columbus, Ohio 43215
Does it cost money to file a claim?
Yes, the filing fee is $25 in cash or by check or money order payable to the Ohio Court of Claims. Please do not mail cash. You may pay by credit card if you eFile. If you can’t afford the filing fee, you must provide written proof that you cannot reasonably afford it and complete and mail an Application to Waive Filing Fee. Even if the Court grants your request, you may still be responsible for court costs associated with your case.
What do I need to know about filing my claim?
Odyssey eFileOH™ is now available in the Ohio Court of Claims. Claims for $10,000 or less: Attach two copies of all supporting documents, which could include certificates of title for vehicles; cost estimates for property repair and/or replacement; medical reports; paid or unpaid bills; accident or police reports; and photos, maps or drawings. If possible, obtain signed and notarized witness statements for the Court’s consideration and include two copies of each one with your claim. Claims greater than $10,000: Provide one copy of your claim for each named defendant (the organization being sued) and one copy for the Ohio Attorney General.
What happens after my claim is filed?
Claims for $10,000 or less: We will send a copy of your claim and any supporting documents to the state agency that, according to you, caused your losses. That state agency will conduct an investigation and file a written report with the Court within 60 days. You will receive a copy of the investigation report, which you may respond to in writing by completing the Response to Investigation Report . For detailed completion instructions, click here . Claims greater than $10,000: The Court will send a written document (summons) and a copy of your claim to officially notify the state organization that a lawsuit has been filed. Additional copies will be sent to the Ohio Attorney General. The state then has 28 days to provide a written response.
Will I need to travel to Columbus for a trial?
If your claim is for more than $10,000, the trial will take place in one of our three Columbus courtrooms. The Court will send you written notice of your assigned trial dates about 30 days after receiving your claim form. If your claim is for $10,000 or less, it will be determined administratively and there is no trial. In accordance with the COVID-19 Protocol established by the Supreme Court of Ohio, most trials are being held virtually until further notice.
What do I need to know before coming to court?
Proper attire is expected at all court proceedings. Cell phones and pagers are allowed in court, but they must be turned off prior to entering the courtroom. Courtroom procedures are open to the public. However, certain subject matters may be inappropriate for small children and younger adults. For information about directions and parking, click here.
How long will it take to decide my claim?
Claims for $10,000 or less:
  • The state agency has 60 days after you file a claim to file its written investigation report.
  • You then have 21 days to file a written response.
  • The Clerk will make a decision after that.
Claims greater than $10,000:
  • It’s possible that your claim will take 12 to 24 months to decide, depending on the circumstances.
  • Click here for a detailed explanation of our Court’s differentiated case management system.
When can I expect payment if I win?
If you win, the Court will order the state to pay you for reasonable losses and to reimburse your filing fee. Payment is made within 60 days of the date of the Court’s judgment, barring any appeals.
If my claim is dismissed or turned down, does it cost anything?
Yes, the $25 filing fee is non-refundable. You may also be billed for court costs not covered by the filing fee.
What if I don’t agree with the decision about my claim?
For claims of $10,000 or less: The losing party may file a Motion for Court Review of the Clerk’s decision within 30 days of the date of that decision. A judge of the Court will review the Clerk’s decision. This will also be done on the basis of the written record and without a hearing. There is no further appeal of the judge’s decision to this or any other court. For claims greater than $10,000: You have the right to appeal the judge’s decision. Appeals of the Court of Claims are heard by the Tenth District Court of Appeals. Please refer to the Ohio Rules of Appellate Procedure and the Local Rules of the Tenth District Court of Appeals for further explanation.
How do I find more details about court rules and state laws?
Please understand that the Court is obligated to follow certain rules and statutes. Failure to comply with these regulations could impact the outcome of your case. For more information, go to our Rules & Statutes webpage.

Fees & Costs

The law requires that you pay a $25 filing fee when filing a complaint. You can pay by credit card if filing online. You must enclose a check or money order if filing by mail, or you may pay cash if filing in person.

Please refer to the following fee schedule for more information:

Claims vs the State

Civil complaint filing fee
$25.00
Counter-claim, cross-claim, third-party complaint & intervening complaint filing fee
$25.00
Issuing each writ, order or notice (except subpoena)
$2.00
Issuing subpoena, swearing witness, entering attendance & certifying fees (each name)
$2.00
Calling a jury (cases that have been removed from common pleas court)
$25.00
Entering on journal, indexing & posting on any docket (each page)
$2.00
Acknowledging all instruments in writing
$2.00
Notice of appeal, including the filing & noting of all necessary documents
$25.00
Each electronic transmission of a document, plus $1.00 for each page of that document (to be paid by the party requesting the electronic transmission)
$2.00
Certified copy of document (per page)
$1.00
Uncertified copy of a document (per page)
$0.10

Crime Victims Compensation Appeals

Filing Fee to Appeal Attorney General’s Decision
No charge
Certified copy of document (per page)
$1.00
Uncertified copy of a document (per page)
$0.10

Glossary of Terms

Reading about legal matters and Court processes can mean coming across unfamiliar words and abbreviations. The glossary below can help you look up and hopefully understand some of the terminology used in the Court of Claims.

In addition, Court News Ohio provides an interactive online glossary to help the public understand the legal terms that Ohio courts and lawyers frequently use.

Administrative Determinations
Small claims (for $10,000 or less) that are decided by the Clerk of the Court and based on the documents, photos, affidavits, etc. that have been submitted for review.
Affidavit
A written statement of facts confirmed by the oath of the party making it, before a notary or officer having authority to administer oaths.
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Settling a dispute without a full, formal trial. Methods include mediation, conciliation, arbitration, and settlement, among others.
Answer
The defendant’s response to the plaintiff’s allegations as stated in a complaint. An item-by-item, paragraph-by-paragraph response to points made in a complaint; part of the pleadings.
Appeal
A higher court’s review of a lower court or administrative agency decision (for example, the Attorney General).
Attorney of Record
The principal attorney in a lawsuit, who signs all formal documents relating to the suit.
Bench Trial
Trial without a jury in which a judge decides the facts.
Case Number
A unique number assigned to a case by each court. In the Court of Claims, the case number is a nine digit number that begins with the year the case is filed. For example, 2014-00229.
Certificate of Service
A signed statement that indicates an exact copy of a document filed with the Court of Claims was provided to every other party in the case. The statement must indicate the names and addresses of everyone who receives a copy, when they were given a copy and how the copy was given or sent to them (for example, by hand delivery or by first-class mail.) All documents offered for filing in the Court of Claims must contain a certificate of service.
Civil Case
A non-criminal case that seeks a particular legal remedy. A civil case usually involves money damages.
Complaint
The legal document that usually begins a civil lawsuit. It states the facts and identifies the action the court is asked to take.
Court Costs
The expenses of prosecuting or defending a lawsuit, other than the attorneys’ fees.
Damages
Money awarded by a court to a person injured by the unlawful act or negligence of another person.
Date of Decision
The date that is file-stamped on the judgment.
Decision
Judgment, decree or determination of findings of fact and/or of law by a judge, court or other judicial officer.
Defendant
The person or organization being sued.
Docket
The list of all proceedings and filings in a case.
Et al
And others
Exhibit
A document or other item introduced as evidence during a trial or hearing.
Expedite
To accelerate. The court can decide to accelerate the progress of a pending matter either on its own or in response to a motion to expedite.
File
To place a paper in the official custody of the clerk of court to enter into the files or records of a case.
Filing Deadline
The date a document must be filed with the clerk’s office. In order to be filed, the document and all required copies must be in the clerk’s office and in full compliance with the applicable Rules by 5 p.m. on the filing deadline.
Filing Fee
The sum of money that must be paid before a case can be filed with the Court of Claims.
Immunity
Immunity refers to a protection from personal liability that may be provided to a state employee who is sued in his or her individual capacity.
Judgment Entry
The court’s written decision in a case.
Judicial Review
The authority of a court to review the official actions of other branches of government. For example, the Ohio Court of Claims has judicial review over decisions made by the Ohio Attorney General on claims for Crime Victims Compensation.
Jurisdiction
A court’s authority to decide a case or issue an order.
Magistrate
Judicial officer exercising some of the functions of a judge.
Mediation
A form of alternative dispute resolution in which the parties bring their dispute to a neutral third party, who helps them agree on a settlement.
Motion
Oral or written request made by a party to an action before, during, or after a trial, upon which a court issues a ruling or order.
Negligence
Failure to exercise the degree of care that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances.
Ohio Revised Code
The laws enacted by the Ohio General Assembly. The Ohio Revised Code is organized by subject matter and divided into general provisions, titles, chapters, and sections.
Opinion
A court’s written statement explaining its final decision in a case.
Original
The document from which a copy is a made; usually includes the original signature of the person filing the document.
Party
A person, business, or government agency actively involved in the prosecution or defense of a legal proceeding.
Petition for Removal
The transfer of a case from one court to another. In this sense, removal refers to a transfer of a case from a common pleas court to the Court of Claims because the state has been named a defendant either by counterclaim or third party claim. This is not discretionary, as the Court of Claims has exclusive jurisdiction over all claims against the state.
Plaintiff
The person who files the complaint in a civil lawsuit.
Pleadings
The written statements of fact and law filed by the parties to a lawsuit.
Pre-Trial Conference
A meeting between the judge and the parties involved in a lawsuit to narrow the issues of the suit, agree on what will be presented at trial, and make a final effort to settle the case without a trial.
Pro Bono
From the Latin “pro bono publico,” meaning “for the public good.” Legal services performed pro bono are performed by a licensed attorney without any expectation of compensation.
Pro Se
Latin for “for one’s self.” A person appearing pro se or filing pro se in a court does so without the assistance of a licensed attorney.
Record
All the documents and evidence plus transcripts of oral proceedings in a case.
Response
The reply by a party to charges raised in a pleading by the other party.
Service
The delivery of a legal document (such as a complaint, summons, subpoena) notifying the person or organization that a lawsuit has been filed against that person or organization.
Settlement
An agreement between the parties disposing of a lawsuit.
Statute of Limitations
The time within which a plaintiff must bring a lawsuit.
Stay
An order suspending or postponing all or part of a judicial proceeding or the judgment from that proceeding.
Summons
A notice to a defendant that he or she has been sued and is required to appear in court.
Testimony
The evidence given by a witness under oath. It does not include evidence from documents and other physical evidence.
Transcript
A written, word-for-word record of what was said, either in a proceeding such as a trial or during some other conversation, such as an oral deposition.
Witness
A person who testifies to what he or she has seen, heard, or otherwise experienced.